Archive for ‘Germany’

Saturday, August 24, 2019

Radio Taiwan International (RTI) Shortwave Transmissions to Europe, from Tamsui

As is tradition, Radio Taiwan International (RTI) will broadcast directly to Europe, from its shortwave facilities in Tamsui.

The broadcasts will be in German, but the schedule published by RTI’s German department (also in German) should be self-explanatory – the German vocabulary in this field isn’t too different from English. The announcement includes a preview of the QSL card that will be sent to confirm reception reports on this year’s direct broadcasts. It features a drawing of Taiwan’s National Radio Museum.

» RTI direct broadcasts schedule

A member of the German broadcasting team reportedly attended Zhongyuan Festival (中元節) earlier this month, and asked for good propagation conditions.

RTI’s German service broadcasts thirty minutes daily, from Kostinbrod transmission site in Bulgaria, on 5900 kHz, from 19:00 to 19:30 UTC (coordinated universal time). These programs appear to be frequently heard all over western and central Europe, as well as in Russia and other formerly Soviet states.

While direct broadcasts from Taiwan in German are a once-in-a-year exception, programs in Russian from Tamsui can be heard daily, on 9590 kHz, from 14:00 to 15:00 UTC. Another transmission in Russian is broadcast via Kostinbrod, from 17:00 to 17:30 UTC.

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Related

Discourse power, Sept 24, 2018
SW broadcasts cut, Mar 29, 2018

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Thursday, July 4, 2019

Updates: Huawei / Hong Kong / Taiwan

Heading into a few weeks of working at half speed, but while the muse keeps kicking me, I don’t feel like doing long translations yet of, say, the Bulgarian president’s visit to China. But the following two news items – neither of them really new – may remain interesting as summer moves on.

Huawei

Trade conflict between America and China – no blog yet either, but here is a bit of it, by means of a few links.

Huawei advertisement, Bremen Central Station, December 2018

“2019 will be big (thanks to
a 6.21 in display)” – advertisement at
Bremen Central Station

A public warning by the Czech cyber watchdog is met with some heavy-handed PRC diplomacy,

Sinopsis wrote in December, with some more entries on the same subject following during the first half of this year.

Addressing concerns about a “kill switch” that could be added to Germany’s G5 infrastructure if Huawei were involved, the company’s Germany boss Dennis Zuo said in an interview with German daily Handelsblatt on February 20 that such a practice by Huawei would be technically impossible – only single components were supplied by any company.

Asked how Huawei would react if state or party demanded access, and if they actually had “a chance to say no”, Zuo said that Huawei would say no indeed – Huawei was owned by its staff, not by the Chinese state. Asked if they would go to court against the Chinese state, Zuo said that they wouldn’t do that, but “we would refuse [access] in any case” (“wir würden dies auf jeden Fall ablehnen”).

German Data Protection Commissioner Ulrich Kelber, also in an interview with Handelsblatt, pointed out that “the US itself once made sure that backdoor doors were built into Cisco hardware.”

Hong Kong / Taiwan

And Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam, in June, awarded Taiwan a democracy and rule-of-law prize, although a somewhat embittered one:

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Updates / Related

2019 HK extradition bill, Wikipedia, acc July 4, 2019

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Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Election Posters and their Hidden Messages

 

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Don’t mess with the Russians

 

 

 

Friday, February 22, 2019

Oh so famous!

Monday, February 18, 2019

Sony ICF 2001 – Early Days of Global Digitalization

Among the large variety of receivers currently available, the Sony ICF 2001 is unique. […] suggests the Sony is probably the first portable shortwave receiver designed to overcome the general public reluctance to tune to shortwave and international broadcasts. With the Sony ICF 2001, nearly anyone can call up a distant station, if the frequency is known.

This is how then South African foreign broadcaster Radio RSA reviewed the Sony ICF 2001 at the time.

Sony would certainly agree, as can be seen from the early 1980s artwork on the box: that wasn’t a receiver, it was a technological sunrise, with a glorious new millennium booming into your face.

Sony ICF 2001 packing

Proclamation of a new Era: Sony ICF 2001 packing

While reviewers at Radio RSA apparently admired the receiver’s sophistication, they did see a potential problem:

The convenience of the ICF 2001 is obviously unique, but for the established shortwave hobbyist, the lack of a conventional tuning knob can be a drawback.”

And battery consumption was deemed “a little high” – average battery lifetime was estimated at around ten hours.

Great points in its favor, as seen by the reviewers, was excellent sensitivity, selectivity, automatic gain control, and just the right bandwith (as long as users wouldn’t want to bother about choosing the right bandwith).

A shortwave listener in South Bend, Indiana, listened to the Radio RSA review on March 14, 1982, and recorded it. About 35.5 years later, he posted it online.

It’s a fascinating document to listen to. The review contains a short original soundtrack of the ICF 2001’s performance, and a bit of (feigned, I suppose) political innocence:

But let’s try medium wave and let’s try Channel 702, broadcasting from Bophuthatswana.

Summing up, the reviewers pointed out that the ICF 2001

has several features not found on other portables, namely the six-channel memory.

OK – that was in 1982.

A shortwave radio blogger who bought a Sony ICF 2001 in 2015 highlights the built-in antenna trimmer – a great feature indeed, and one the Sony ICF 2001 D (the Sony ICF 2010’s edition for the German market) was lacking.

Obviously, when the year of 2001 really arrived, the internet had been there for years, and even the world’s most incredible shortwave receiver wouldn’t lure a dog from behind the stove, as a German saying goes.

That said, it might still work on dogs older than forty.

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Tsai Ing-wen: Beijing’s Threats do Harm beyond Taiwan

When China threatens war, media do become interested in Taiwan (even though the threat is nothing new), Klaus Bardenhagen, a German correspondent in Taipei, wrote on January 6. His post links to an English translation of Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen‘s new year’s address on January 1, to a summary of Chinese CCP secretary general and State Chairman Xi Jinping‘s “Taiwan message anniversary” speech (January 2), and to Tsai Ing-wen’s reaction to that speech (also on January 2).

Bardenhagen points out that the main newsworthy content in Xi’s speech was an equation of the “1992 consensus” with “one country, one systems” formula.

His post also reports President Tsai’s international press conference (or reception) on January 5 (see above video, statement in English).

Bardenhagen asked her what Taiwan would wish countries like Germany to do in this situation. Apparently, she didn’t reply with a specific demand to Germany, but to Taiwan’s general role in the community of other democracies:

When such a country faces difficulties and threats, we hope that the international community will watch this closely, speak on our behalf, and support us.

當這樣的國家面臨困難, 面臨威脅的時候,我們希望國際社會能夠重視,而且能夠替我們發聲、來協助我們

Because if a country like this one – that practices democracy and these internationally held values – is threatened and infringed upon, I believe that this harms democracy and many values. If Taiwan faces this situation and there is no international assistance to Taiwan rasing its voice, if Taiwan isn’t supported internationally, we have to ask which country will be next.

因為如果一個實踐民主,實踐這個國際共同的價值這麼努力的國家受到威脅,受到侵害,我相信,對民主,對很多的價值也是一種傷害。如果今天台灣面臨這樣的情況,國際不替台灣發聲,國際不為台灣來協助的話,我們要問下一個就是哪一個國家。

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Related

Press Reception, ROC President, Jan 5, 2019
“We uphold our Principles,” Jan 2, 2019

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Monday, December 24, 2018

Merry Christmas

Weser River, Verden District (West)

Weser River, Verden District (West)

Merry Christmas, run, run, Rudolph, and let it snow.

Monday, December 3, 2018

Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) Christmas Program on Shortwave

Following an established annual routine, Northern German Radio (NDR) broadcasts a four-hours Christmas program on shortwave – “Gruß an Bord” (greeting all ships) – on December 24, from 19:00 to 23:00 UTC.

ear

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Time
Freq. Transmit- Target
(UTC) (kHz) ter site area
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19:00 – 6,080 Nauen, Atlantic N
21:00 Germany
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19:00 – 11,650 Issoudun, Atlantic S
21:00
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19:00 – 9,800 Issoudun, Atlantic,
21:00 France Indian O.,
Sth Africa
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19:00 – 9,740 Nauen, Indian
21:00 Germany Ocean W
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19:00 – 9,570 Moos- Indian
21:00 brunn, Ocean E
Austria
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19:00 – 6,030 Armenia Europe
21:00
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21:00 – 6,145 Nauen Atlantic N
21:00
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21:00 – 9,830 Issoudun Atlantic S
21:00
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21:00 – 9,590 Issoudun Atlantic,
23:00 Indian O.,
Sth Africa
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21:00 – 9,720 Nauen Indian
23:00 Ocean W
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21:00 – 9,650 Moos- Indian
23:00 brunn Ocean E
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21:00 – 6,155 Armenia Europe
23:00
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Sources

Gruss an Bord, NDR, Nov 28, 2018
Background, RBB, Nov 17, 2018
History, Dec 25, 2017

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