Hung Hsiu-chu elected KMT Chairwoman

Hung Hsiu-chu, the KMT’s presidential nominee until October 2015 (when she was ditched and replaced by Eric Chu), has been elected KMT chairwoman today. She replaces Eric Chu who resigned as KMT chairman in January, after suffering a heavy defeat as the KMT’s presidential candidate. According to this website, turnout was low.

A new leader will be elected in July 2017, a year and four months from now.

Will she stand for re-election then? And would she be re-elected?

Not necessarily. She hasn’t been quite the diplomat during her political career so far, and a successful KMT chairperson would need great skills to integrate the different tempers and political directions within the KMT.

Her position concerning relations with China were a factor in bringing her down as the KMT’s presidential nominee – she was deemed to close to Beijing. To become a long-term KMT chairperson, the least she would need to do is to move away from her “unification” position.

You may actually be quite “Chinese”, and still become Taiwan’s president. In a post for a University of Nottingham blog, Michael Cole describes how seemingly “pro-unification” parties may be vulnerable to movements that consider themselves Chinese on the one hand, but by no means “pro-Beijing”.

In May, Tsai Ing-wen will be sworn in as President of the Republic of China on Taiwan. And the main opposition leader will be Hung Hsiu-chu. Sounds like a fascinating constellation.

2 Comments to “Hung Hsiu-chu elected KMT Chairwoman”

  1. Cole’s suggestion of a “hua du” tendency has had a bit of a counter-response. Personally I can’t work up a strong opinion either way and see that both sides have a point:

    https://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/chinapolicyinstitute/2016/03/28/91241/

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  2. There aren’t as many surveys (and details re public opinion) as I would like to see from Taiwan – this would include what Ben Guoren and Turton say about hose polls provide too little information on the identity of respondents to conclude that those who favour the status-quo have a unique and consciously shared political identity.

    But let’s look at the political class alone: Ma Ying-jeou, especially before and/or at the beginning of his presidency, suggested that there was no need to declare Taiwanese independence because the Republic of China was independent anyway. I can’t tell if that is still President Ma’s position, but Tsai Ing-wen seems to be moving towards it, doesn’t she?

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