Shortwave Log, Northern Germany, June 2014: Russia, Ukraine, and Disasters

1. Russian Domestic Radio / Use of Shortwave

The Voice of Russia (VoR) as a foreign radio service can probably be considered dead for good. But when it comes to domestic broadcasts, the picture may be somewhat different. Radio Rossii or Radio Rossiya Segodnya (the domestic service not the external “Russia Today” channel) and VGTRK abandoned their long wave and shortwave frequencies earlier this year (January 9 in Radio Rossii’s case), but the Security Council of the Russian Federation appears to have second thoughts about the move. A new agency, under the defense ministry’s jurisdiction, may be in charge of the transmission sites from 2016 on, Radio Eins (RBB) reports, quoting Russian website lenta.ru.

 A shortwave transmitter can reach both local and global audiences,

Oldrich Cip, chairman of the HFCC (high-frequency coordination conference) wrote in an article for UNESCO in 2013.

 This is due to the unique long-distance propagation property of shortwave radio by means of multiple reflections from layers in the upper earth’s atmosphere. Shortwave radio can provide service where other platforms such as satellite, FM or Internet are unavailable due to high cost, geographical location, lack of infrastructure, or even during natural or man-made disasters. Receivers are inexpensive and require no access fees. Shortwave radio is important for people living or travelling in isolated regions. It reaches across the digital divide to the most disadvantaged and marginalised societies.

This, in turn, would be in keeping with the Declaration and Action Plan of the World Summit on the Information Society, Cip added.

People at the margins of society would hardly be important business in Russian politics, but natural or man-made disasters may indeed be among the Russian Security Council’s concerns. In fact, Radio Vesti the news channel of VGTRK, returned to medium wave on March 2 or 3 this year. One of the reactivated frequencies, 1215 kHz, used to carry the Voice of Russia’s German programs on medium wave until 2012, apparently for ethnic Russian listeners or Russian speaking people in Ukraine. By March 22, Ukrainian authorities removed the Russian broadcaster from the national cable networks – medium wave thus became a backup for Vesti listeners.

Radio Kiev QSL, 1985

A bluesy QSL card from Kiev, confirming reception of a shortwave broadcast in German, on December 8, 1985.
Click picture for Radio Ukraine International (formerly Radio Kiev).

A high-tech country, too, stepped up shortwave broadcasts recently. On March 30, Radio Japan added broadcasts in Japanese to eastern Europe, on shortwave frequencies, from relay stations in the UK, the UAE, and directly from Japan – see Japan/UAE/U.K. Additional broadcasts of Radio Japan here. Apparently, NHK acts on the assumption that there are Japanese nationals in the region who still listen to shortwave.

And the Voice of Turkey (TRT Ankara/Emirler) broadcasts in Tatar daily from 10:00 to 10:25 UTC, on 9855 kHz shortwave. The target area is Crimea, with its minority of Crimean Tatars.

But not only man-made disasters may highlight the importance of shortwave. Many places in Asia are highly vulnerable to natural disaster. From June 5 to 6 this year, Radio Australia, the BBC World Service (Thailand relay), Radio Vatican, SLBC Sri Lanka, FEBC Philippines, IBB (this appears to be the International Broadcasting Bureau), MGLOB Madagascar, Radio Japan (Palau relay), RTC (i. e. China Radio International and CPBS transmission sites in China), and KTWR Agana took part in a shortwave trial program, practical test of a project developed by the HFCC – international Radio Delivery association in cooperation with Arab States and Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Unions.

____

Related

» Dysfunctional, AFGE, probably Spring 2014

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2. Recent Logs, June 2014

International Telecommunication Union letter codes used in the table underneath:
ARG – Argentina; B – Brazil; BIH – Bosnia and Herzegovina; CAN – Canada; CHN – China; CUB – Cuba; D – Germany; IND – India; IRN – Iran; J – Japan; KRE – North Korea; TIB – Tibet; TJK – Tajikistan.

Languages (“L.”):
C – Chinese; E – English; F – French; G – German; P – Portuguese; S – Spanish; T – Tibetan.

kHz

Station

Ctry

L.

Day

GMT

S I O
 5040 RHC
Cuba
 CUB E June
1
05:00 4 5 4
15250 VoA  TJK C June
1
10:59 2 3 2
15250 CPBS/
CNR
 1) C June
1
11:00 4 4 4
 9540 Radio
Japan
 J C June
1
15:30 4 4 4
13760 Voice of
Korea
 KRE E June
2
13:00 4 4 4
 7550 AIR
Delhi
 IND E June
2
18:00 5 5 5
15345 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
2
18:05 5 5 3
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG ? June
5
01:57 2 3 2
11710 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
6
02:28 5 5 4
11780 Radio
Nacional
da
Brasilia
 B P June
6
02:57 4 5 3
 6160 St. Johns  CAN E June
8
02:35 4 3 3
 6005 Radio
Atlantic
 D F June
8
08:50 5 5 5
17510 AIR
Delhi
 IND E June
8
10:00 3 4 3
 9540 Radio
Japan
 J C June
11
15:30 4 3 3
11710 RAE
Buenos
Aires 2)
 ARG S June
12
02:00 4 4 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
14
21:00 5 4 4
 7365 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
14
21:07 5 4 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
14
21:21 5 5 5
 7315 IRIB
Tehran
 IRN E June
15
19:24 5 5 4
 6100 Radio
Serbia
Inter-
national
 BIH G June
15
20:00 5 2 3
 7550 AIR
Delhi
 IND E June
16
20:45 5 5 4
15345 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG G June
17
21:00 5 4 4
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
20
02:28 3 4 3
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
21
15:00 5 5 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
21
21:00 5 5 5
 4905 PBS
Tibet
3)
 TIB T June
21
21:28 4 4 3
 7230 CPBS/
CNR
 CHN C June
21
22:00 4 3 3
 7240 PBS
Tibet/
CPBS
 TIB C June
21
22:03 4 4 4
 7550 AIR
Delhi
 IND E June
23
18:00 5 5 5
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires 4)
 ARG ? June
26
02:08 0 0 0
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
27
02:27 4 5 4
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
28
02:39 3 5 2
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
28
06:30 5 5 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
28
09:44 3 2 2
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
1
09:45 4 4 4
 7365 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
1
09:52 4 3 3

____

Footnotes

1) I don’t know of any CNR/CPBS stations outside China, but the frequency wasn’t listed for China at the time. Probably, CPBS’ sole purpose for broadcasting on 15250 kHz was to jam the Voice of America broadcast on the same frequency. However Shortwave-Info lists CPBS as a “CNR-1 mystery”, broadcasting daily from 22:01 to 22:02 UTC.
2) Should have been English program at the time, according to schedule.
3) Intermittent Morse signals; fine otherwise.
4)   Only the carrier signal audible, apparently without any modulation.

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