Shortwave Log, Northern Germany, November 2011

The choice of frequencies reflects the season: all moving downward (in terms of kHz), and to the upper meter bands. That said, Radio New Zealand‘s frequency in the 19-meter-band – 15720 kHz, around 11:00 UTC – comes in with a slightly weaker signal than 9765 kHz (as recorded in the table underneath), but also with less interference from other stations, and with less atmospheric noise. Both transmissions are powered with 100 kilowatts, according to Shortwave Info, with the Pacific Islands as their target area.

Radio Damascus QSL 1980s

Radio Damascus shortwave QSL, 1980s

International Telecommunication Union letter codes used in the table underneath:
AFS – South Africa; ALB – Albania; KRE – North Korea; NZL – New Zealand; RUS – Russia; SYR – Syria; TUR – Turkey.

Languages (“L.”):
C – Chinese; E – English; G – German.

kHz

Station

Ctry

L.

Day

Time GMT

S I O
9765 Radio New Zealand NZL E. Nov 11 17:10 5 4 4
6285 Voice of Korea KRE G. Nov 11 19:00 5 5 4
4880 SABC AFS E. Nov 15 18:30 3 3 3
9330 Radio Damascus SYR G. Nov 15 18:00 3 3 3
7205 TRT Ankara TUR G. Nov 15 18:30 4 4 4
6020 China R. Internat. ALB C. Nov 18 02:00 5 5 5
7250 V. o. Russia RUS E. Nov 18 03:00 4 4 4

A big advantage of the internet is that you can look up precisely the articles and topics which interest you most. But at times, I’ll keep listening to a radio broadcast for half an hour, or even an hour, and it may take me to topics which I wouldn’t have thought of otherwise.

I’d still rather do without the internet than without shortwave – another good thing about the latter is that it doesn’t consume nearly as much time. You can do all kinds of things along the way, until something catches your ear.

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Related

» Previous Logs, August 28, 2011

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3 Responses to “Shortwave Log, Northern Germany, November 2011”

  1. “I’d still rather do without the internet than without shortwave – another good thing about the latter is that it doesn’t consume nearly as much time. You can do all kinds of things along the way, until something catches your ear.”

    Part of the reason why, except for the ceaseless making and drinking of cups of tea, nothing evokes home to me more than the half-listened-to sound of BBC Radio 4.

    Like

  2. Yeah, and it can’t come any more homelike – at home and abroad – than through its longwave frequency, 198 kHz. The days of which, sad to say, are numbered.

    Like

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