Happy New Year: Anger and Aspirations

The puddle of knowledge is muddy when it comes to comparisons between China and Egypt. Media coverage caters to sensationalism – “could it happen in China, too?” And bloggers are mostly stumped when it comes to this question. Me too.

The nice things about blogs is that people can have a dialog. Stuff like this discussion, very much in its fledgling stage, with King Tubby, on one of Adam Cathcart‘s posts.

It is easy for me to see a feeling which people across borders and continents have in common. It’s anger. It is frequently kept down, as it faces overwhelming circumstances or powers, but it bursts out all the more once fear of such circumstances or powers is gone. How many Egyptians have been angry for years or decades? How many have only discovered their anger once their fear evaporated, probably not least thanks to the army’s assurance that it respects the legitimate rights of the people ? Anger and fear was something that many people in Egypt and China used to have in common. Most people in Egypt were or are afraid of others. People used to fear their leaders. Many “elites” were afraid of the people in the past, and are still more afraid of the people now. Many of the “common people” were more afraid in the past than. But many of them will be afraid, now, too – not least religious minorities.

Anger and fear are things that many societies have in common. China may not see an uprising any time soon, but if it did, it would be time for the leaders to either depend on the army, or to join their children in Oxford and New Haven, Connecticut.

That much about anger. But what about peoples’ aspirations? Positive feelings, feelings that aim for something deemed good, are much harder to identify than anger.

A happy year of the Rabbit to everyone.

____________

Related
Don’t simplify the Big Topic, January 30, 2011
Turning Gallbladders into Strength, December 10, 2010
Some Time, in an unguarded Moment, September 29, 2010
The Art of Happiness, December 9, 2008

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