Archive for July 12th, 2009

Sunday, July 12, 2009

JR’s Weekender: Anger Management and Anger Manipulation

Thousands of Turks and Uighur expatriates took to the streets across Turkey after Friday prayers, protesting the violence in Xinjiang and burning Chinese flags, according to AFP. The times have changed – it is hard to imagine that any news could have sparked that much anger that quickly only fifteen years ago. But no matter if it is the West, the Middle East, China, or elsewhere, rightful indignation has become a way of life – it is latently simmering in the background, and erupts whenever a Pope says something “wrong”, when a Paralympics athlete is attacked in her wheelchair, when Danish authors depict prophet Mohamed, or when a former German chancellor defies a smoking ban.

No trivialization of Beijing’s policies meant. If protests lead to the right results, such as to a visa for Rebiya Kadeer, this should be welcomed. But it shouldn’t take statements like prime minister Erdoğan‘s to channel or manage Turkish public anger. Such statements hold just more seeds for more of the same anger, because what the prime minister said went beyond the cruel reality. What kind of vocabulary does he intend to use in case of a real genocide?

Chinese indignation, on the other hand, has been given a beautiful mouthpiece just recently. The “Global Times” has probably qualified for the silliest article of the month last week (granted, we are still counting the days). The article demonstrates another kind of anger management. Until three years ago, the Bush administration had managed very successfully to brand any American national who opposed police-state measures as a “traitor” – they left the defamation routine to their proxies, but it was part of the White House’s own work. No wonder that China is trying to ride the pig chased through the global village by George W. Bush. And no wonder that the Chinese government was much happier with the 43rd American president than many other global villagers.

Anyone who supported or still condones the Bush administration’s approach to the war on terrorism should at least sympathize with one of the Global Times‘ points:

Five years ago, when terrorist bombings hit Turkey in November 2003, China took its firm stand on the side of Turkish people and condemned the violent act. However, when the riots happened, inflicting casualities and property damage in Urumqi on July 5, Turkey stands by the side of the thugs, reavealing its shame to the whole world and repaying China with evilness.

But it takes Bush or Cheney logic to see eye to eye with such ideas. The war on terrorism served the agenda of those Mssrs and their cronies’ agenda. The Iraq war wasn’t about going after terrorists. And Beijing’s “war on terrorism in Xinjiang” is just a scam to deflect global attention from the failure its national minorities policy is. Let’s face it: there will more of the same disaster somewhat further south, once the Dalai Lama is no longer around. Unless Beijing stops blaming its own failure on Turkey and other “hostile forces abroad”, and starts looking at the roots of the problems at home, that is.

Sunday, July 12, 2009

Xinjiang, Quote of the Week

I’d like to point out that history rarely had any play in matters of sovereignty. For example, it can be safely said that India has a history that is completely different than that of Britain, yet that didn’t stop Britain from taking over India. I think that politics play a bigger role in sovereignty than anything (big surprise). So I think that it’s rather pointless for pro-China or pro-Uighur supporters to drag out arguments based on history, and instead focus on things such as human right abuses, etc.

A commenter on Underthejacaranda, July 11

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