Posts tagged ‘communication’

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

How Logical, Mr. Palmer!

When business is going fine, CCP cadres are partners. When it’s going less well, they are mongrels [who] shoot their own people.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Meeting in Myanmar: Correcting “False Impressions” created by Japan

Japanese foreign minister Fumio Kishida and his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi met on the sidelines of the 47th ASEAN foreign ministers’ meeting in Myanmar’s (aka Burma’s) capital city Naypyidaw, and the 4th East Asia Summit Foreign Ministers’ Meeting, an extension of the ASEAN conference that also includes China and Japan. The two chief diplomats reportedly met in the evening of Saturday, August 9. Both ministers took seats during their – informal – bilateral meeting which ended around 11 p.m. local time, according to a Xinhua report of August 11, apparently quoting Japan’s Kyodo news agency.

The same Xinhua article also quotes an academic from the Chinese ministry of commerce’s research institute who had told Huanqiu Shibao that Wang Yi’s preparedness to have informal talks with his Japanese counterpart showed China’s sincerity and peaceful intentions.

Fumio Kishida made public comments about the meeting on Sunday morning, according to Xinhua quoting Kyodo. It was the first meeting between a Japanese and a Chinese foreign minister after Japanese prime minister had regained office in December 2012.

Last time, then Japanese foreign minister Koichiro Gemba and then Chinese foreign minister Yang Jiechi held talks in September 2012, according to a Asahi Chinese news article on Sunday. Apparently, this refers to a meeting on September 26, 2012, in New York. At the time, nearly two years ago, Gemba reportedly referred to his talks with Yang as “severe”.

According to the Xinhua article, the meeting took place at Kishida’s request. However, the same article also quotes Japan’s Kyodo news agency as saying that Beijing had been interested in talks between the minister, in the run-up to the APEC summit that is going to be held in Beijing in November. However, if there would be a meeting between Chinese party and state leader Xi Jinping and Japan’s prime minister Shinzo Abe would still depend on Japan, not least on the issue of the Yasukuni Shrine. If prime minister Abe decided to visit the shrine on August 15 – the day when a Japanese leader usually visits if he decides to do so at all -, Beijing could still change its mind, Xinhua quotes Mainichi Shimbun.

Hong Kong’s Phoenix Media published a Caixin report on Sunday, referring to a “secret visit” to Beijing, made by former Japanese prime minister Yasuo Fukuda. The South China Morning Post (SCMP, Hong Kong) had reported the elder statesman’s visit to Beijing (and his possible meeting with Xi Jinping) on August 1, and the Asahi Shimbun reported on August 3 that Yasuo Fukuda had indeed met the Chinese leader, and that the former prime minister had made use of his personal network in China, rather than of the Japanese foreign ministry, to arrange a meeting.

The Chinese side in particular appears to emphasize the unofficial nature of the meeting, and towards the end of the Xinhua article, Tang Chunfeng (唐淳风), described as a resarcher at a minstry of commerce research institute (and maybe a former official at the Chinese embassy in Tokyo), is quoted as saying that Japan’s leaders needed to understand that Sino-American relations would develop regardless of Japan, as Japan didn’t have the resources to balance those relations.

The Xinhua article is fairly deliberative, by Xinhua standards anyway. After all, it includes Japanese assessments that Beijing, too, might be interested in a Abe-Xi summit. But the appearance of a researcher like Tang Chunfeng is no coincidence. Remarks by Tang open and close the article, and Tang’s closing remarks, besides playing Japan’s international weight down (which should go down well with most Chinese readers and soothe any possible anger), Tang also points out that Japan, while being responsible for the Sino-Japanese tensions, always tries to give the world the impression that “China doesn’t give Japan any opportunities to talk” (唐淳风对《环球时报》说,中日关系紧张的责任在日方,而日方总是试图给外界造成“中国不给日方任何和谈机会”的假象).

According to Radio Japan‘s Chinese service (August 10 podcast, 21:01 JST),

it is believed that Wang Yi, during the meeting, emphasized China’s standard [or consistent] position that China wouldn’t make concessions on these issues [Senkaku / Diaoyu Islands], and hoped that Japan would make concessions.

关于尖阁诸岛(中国称钓鱼岛)问题以及历史认识问题,据认为,王毅在会谈中强调了中国的一贯立场,即中方不会在这些问题上退让,并希望日方作出让步。

Also according to Radio Japan, Wang Yi told “this station” (i. e. Radio Japan or NHK) that the meeting had been an informal contact (非正式接触). Radio Japan’s English podcast, posted at the same time as the Chinese one, at 21:01 on Sunday, also contained information about the ministerial meeting but did not mention Wang Yi’s note that the meeting had been informal.

Radio Japan is also informally jammed by China. Domestic Chinese broadcaster CPBS (or CNR) has occupied the afternoon (UTC) frequency of 9540 kHz since July. All the same, there seem to be listeners in China, be it by radio or by podcast. In a tieba forum (The Syria Situation Bar Room), a member posted a transcript of the newscast.

While in Myanmar, Fumio Kishida also met North Korean foreign minister Ri Su Yong and South Korean foreign minister Yun Byung-se. The only thing Kishida and his South Korean counterpart apparently agreed about was the need to improve relations:

South Korea’s KBS World reports that

In the meeting, which is their first in eleven months, [the South Korean foreignminister] said that if Japan shows sincerity on historical issues and Japan’s wartime atrocities, the two nations could find a breakthrough in improving ties.
The minister also asked Japanese politicians to use wisdom in order to find a way out of the strained ties, mentioning Japanese leaders’ visits to the Yasukuni Shrine and Japan’s recent review of the Kono Statement, a landmark 1993 apology for its wartime use of sexual slavery.
In response, Kishida said that there exist difficult issues between the two nations, but improved ties would provide mutual benefits for both sides.

Maybe unwittingly, maybe intentionally, a picture of the Korean politician and his Chinese, rather than his Japanese counterpart, adorns the KBS news article.

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Related

» Two Men and a Pet, Huolong, June 1, 2014
» Making Patriotism useful, Sept 17, 2012

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Thursday, August 7, 2014

Obituary: Julian Anderson, 1962 – 2014

Julian Anderson, an avid shortwave listener in Buenos Aires, Argentina, died on Wednesday, according to Glenn Hauser‘s audio magazine World of Radio as recorded and aired today. Anderson’s name was known to people who were interested in shortwave radio and who were always looking for information and advice, particularly in the days prior to the internet. From January 1988 to August 1992, Anderson published 51 volumes of a news bulletin on Latin American radio, Pampas DXing. With another radio fan, late Gabriel Ivan Barrera from Chile, he also published a number of editions of Latin American Radio World – Home Service Stations, and The Art of Latin American QSLing. Publications like these, often quoted overseas, helped listeners elsewhere in the world to understand what was going on on Latin American frequencies.

This was typical after-hours work of highly dedicated radioaficionados at a time when the easiest (or only) ways to keep people connected and information flowing were the phone, possibly a fax machine, and shortwave radio.

La Galena del Sur, a blog from Uruguay, contains a number of photos from the 1970s and 1980s, featuring a number of  active – and renowned, among shortwave listeners – South American radio fans, including Julian Anderson. The Galena blogger, Horacio A. Nigro, posted the news about Anderson’s passing on Facebook on Wednesday, according to World of Radio.

Thursday, July 3, 2014

State Vandalism on the Air: from Beijing with Fear and Loathing

It couldn’t last. NHK Radio Japan‘s Chinese programs on 9540 kHz came in with a good signal here in Northern Germany for many months, but that seems to be over now. China People’s Broadcasting Station (CPBS), aka China National Radio (CNR) from mainland China occupies the frequency now.

Radio Japan QSL card from 1986, showing a tea plantation.

Can you pick us up? A Radio Japan QSL card from 1986, showing a tea plantation.

That doesn’t make Radio Japan completely inaudible here, but it’s no fun to listen to a faint Japanese signal behind vocal mainland Chinese commercials. I’ll probably switch NHK podcasts.

To use domestic radio to block international broadcasters is vandalism.

When it comes to certain historical Chinese facts, the Communist Party of China can’t even coexist with them. It seems that Beijing can’t coexist with information from abroad – no matter if facts, lies, or propaganda – either.

The way China is jamming Radio Japan is, by the way, a pussy-footed way of spoiling shortwave. The “Firedrake” would, at least, be a candid statement, even if still as ugly.

Rebroadcasts of China Radio International (CRI) programs and other Beijing-made propaganda, like the ones via Radio Luxemburg‘s 1440 kHz, ought to be tagged with an announcement at the beginning and the end of every hour on the air, informing listeners that while they can listen to the message from Beijing unimpeded, the senders themselves are denying Chinese nationals the experience of listening to international broadcasters.

That one line would tell more about China than a one-hour broadcast by China Radio International.

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Updates/Related

» Radio Japan Mandarin podcasts, regularly updated
» Jamming of BBC continues, March 28, 2014

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Sunday, June 29, 2014

Shortwave Log, Northern Germany, June 2014: Russia, Ukraine, and Disasters

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1. Russian Domestic Radio / Use of Shortwave

The Voice of Russia (VoR) as a foreign radio service can probably be considered dead for good. But when it comes to domestic broadcasts, the picture may be somewhat different. Radio Rossii or Radio Rossiya Segodnya (the domestic service not the external “Russia Today” channel) and VGTRK abandoned their long wave and shortwave frequencies earlier this year (January 9 in Radio Rossii’s case), but the Security Council of the Russian Federation appears to have second thoughts about the move. A new agency, under the defense ministry’s jurisdiction, may be in charge of the transmission sites from 2016 on, Radio Eins (RBB) reports, quoting Russian website lenta.ru.

 A shortwave transmitter can reach both local and global audiences,

Oldrich Cip, chairman of the HFCC (high-frequency coordination conference) wrote in an article for UNESCO in 2013.

 This is due to the unique long-distance propagation property of shortwave radio by means of multiple reflections from layers in the upper earth’s atmosphere. Shortwave radio can provide service where other platforms such as satellite, FM or Internet are unavailable due to high cost, geographical location, lack of infrastructure, or even during natural or man-made disasters. Receivers are inexpensive and require no access fees. Shortwave radio is important for people living or travelling in isolated regions. It reaches across the digital divide to the most disadvantaged and marginalised societies.

This, in turn, would be in keeping with the Declaration and Action Plan of the World Summit on the Information Society, Cip added.

People at the margins of society would hardly be important business in Russian politics, but natural or man-made disasters may indeed be among the Russian Security Council’s concerns. In fact, Radio Vesti the news channel of VGTRK, returned to medium wave on March 2 or 3 this year. One of the reactivated frequencies, 1215 kHz, used to carry the Voice of Russia’s German programs on medium wave until 2012, apparently for ethnic Russian listeners or Russian speaking people in Ukraine. By March 22, Ukrainian authorities removed the Russian broadcaster from the national cable networks – medium wave thus became a backup for Vesti listeners.

Radio Kiev QSL, 1985

A bluesy QSL card from Kiev, confirming reception of a shortwave broadcast in German, on December 8, 1985.
Click picture for Radio Ukraine International (formerly Radio Kiev).

A high-tech country, too, stepped up shortwave broadcasts recently. On March 30, Radio Japan added broadcasts in Japanese to eastern Europe, on shortwave frequencies, from relay stations in the UK, the UAE, and directly from Japan – see Japan/UAE/U.K. Additional broadcasts of Radio Japan here. Apparently, NHK acts on the assumption that there are Japanese nationals in the region who still listen to shortwave.

And the Voice of Turkey (TRT Ankara/Emirler) broadcasts in Tatar daily from 10:00 to 10:25 UTC, on 9855 kHz shortwave. The target area is Crimea, with its minority of Crimean Tatars.

But not only man-made disasters may highlight the importance of shortwave. Many places in Asia are highly vulnerable to natural disaster. From June 5 to 6 this year, Radio Australia, the BBC World Service (Thailand relay), Radio Vatican, SLBC Sri Lanka, FEBC Philippines, IBB (this appears to be the International Broadcasting Bureau), MGLOB Madagascar, Radio Japan (Palau relay), RTC (i. e. China Radio International and CPBS transmission sites in China), and KTWR Agana took part in a shortwave trial program, practical test of a project developed by the HFCC – international Radio Delivery association in cooperation with Arab States and Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Unions.

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Related

» Dysfunctional, AFGE, probably Spring 2014

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2. Recent Logs, June 2014

International Telecommunication Union letter codes used in the table underneath:
ARG – Argentina; B – Brazil; BIH – Bosnia and Herzegovina; CAN – Canada; CHN – China; CUB – Cuba; D – Germany; IND – India; IRN – Iran; J – Japan; KRE – North Korea; TIB – Tibet; TJK – Tajikistan.

Languages (“L.”):
C – Chinese; E – English; F – French; G – German; P – Portuguese; S – Spanish; T – Tibetan.

kHz

Station

Ctry

L.

Day

GMT

S I O
 5040 RHC
Cuba
 CUB E June
1
05:00 4 5 4
15250 VoA  TJK C June
1
10:59 2 3 2
15250 CPBS/
CNR
 1) C June
1
11:00 4 4 4
 9540 Radio
Japan
 J C June
1
15:30 4 4 4
13760 Voice of
Korea
 KRE E June
2
13:00 4 4 4
 7550 AIR
Delhi
 IND E June
2
18:00 5 5 5
15345 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
2
18:05 5 5 3
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG ? June
5
01:57 2 3 2
11710 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
6
02:28 5 5 4
11780 Radio
Nacional
da
Brasilia
 B P June
6
02:57 4 5 3
 6160 St. Johns  CAN E June
8
02:35 4 3 3
 6005 Radio
Atlantic
 D F June
8
08:50 5 5 5
17510 AIR
Delhi
 IND E June
8
10:00 3 4 3
 9540 Radio
Japan
 J C June
11
15:30 4 3 3
11710 RAE
Buenos
Aires 2)
 ARG S June
12
02:00 4 4 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
14
21:00 5 4 4
 7365 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
14
21:07 5 4 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
14
21:21 5 5 5
 7315 IRIB
Tehran
 IRN E June
15
19:24 5 5 4
 6100 Radio
Serbia
Inter-
national
 BIH G June
15
20:00 5 2 3
 7550 AIR
Delhi
 IND E June
16
20:45 5 5 4
15345 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG G June
17
21:00 5 4 4
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
20
02:28 3 4 3
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
21
15:00 5 5 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
21
21:00 5 5 5
 4905 PBS
Tibet
3)
 TIB T June
21
21:28 4 4 3
 7230 CPBS/
CNR
 CHN C June
21
22:00 4 3 3
 7240 PBS
Tibet/
CPBS
 TIB C June
21
22:03 4 4 4
 7550 AIR
Delhi
 IND E June
23
18:00 5 5 5
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires 4)
 ARG ? June
26
02:08 0 0 0
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
27
02:27 4 5 4
11711 RAE
Buenos
Aires
 ARG E June
28
02:39 3 5 2
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
28
06:30 5 5 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
28
09:44 3 2 2
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
1
09:45 4 4 4
 7365 HCJB
Weener-
moor
 D G June
1
09:52 4 3 3

____

Footnotes

1) I don’t know of any CNR/CPBS stations outside China, but the frequency wasn’t listed for China at the time. Probably, CPBS’ sole purpose for broadcasting on 15250 kHz was to jam the Voice of America broadcast on the same frequency. However Shortwave-Info lists CPBS as a “CNR-1 mystery”, broadcasting daily from 22:01 to 22:02 UTC.
2) Should have been English program at the time, according to schedule.
3) Intermittent Morse signals; fine otherwise.
4)   Only the carrier signal audible, apparently without any modulation.

____

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Harmonizing Voice of America? U.S. “will never beat China and Russia in the Game of official Propaganda”

The Washington Post objected to ideas on Capitol Hill and within the Obama administration on foreign broadcasting last week. The concepts discussed among members of Congress and U.S. officials would spell a dangerous step toward converting the most venerable and listened-to U.S. outlet, Voice of America, into another official mouthpiece, the Washington Post wrote.The United States would never beat China and Russia in the game of official propaganda, but it could win the war of ideas — if it doesn’t lose faith in its own principles.

Radio Moscow QSL, apparently featuring the Lenin Mausoleum, 1980s.

“We now take you to the White House” (Radio Moscow QSL, 1980s)

____________

Related

» The Only Answer, May 24, 2014
» Deutsche Welle, Jan 26, 2012
» Radio Taiwan International, Oct 2008

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Saturday, May 31, 2014

Shortwave Log, Northern Germany, April 2014: France Inter / Radio France Internationale

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1. France Inter (long wave) / Radio France Internationale (short wave)

The Eiffel Tower was the first recorded site of wireless telegraphy, conducted there by Eugène Ducretet & associates, in 1898. And a bit more than 23 years later, the Eiffel Tower was also the site of the first regular radio broadcast for the general public, according to this website. As usual in regional broadcasting before the age of FM, Radio Tour Eiffel was a medium-wave broadcaster.

At the time, between the two world wars, there was both state-owned and private broadcasting.1)

Gustave-Auguste Ferrié, an army general since 1919, was a French radio pioneer, at work basically everywhere where a new radio station came out of the eggshell. Deemed essential for the further development of radio, he wasn’t retired when reaching the age limit.

Radio Tour Eiffel inauguration, 1922

Sacha Guitry (a broadcaster and film director), Yvonne Printemps (a singer) and General Ferrié at the inauguration of Radio Tour Eiffel, 1922
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Not only medium wave, but long wave, too, was an option, and it was also in Ferrié’s plans, according to this website by Thierry Vignaud. Rambouillet had originally been the designated transmitter site, but Allouis was then chosen for its location in central France, and for being sufficiently distant from major mountain ranges (or massifs). Allouis was also meant to become the site for shortwave transmissions. Shortwave transmissions started in 1931.

An article published by French magazine La Nature in February 1945, also republished online by Vignaud, suggested that with the Allouis site, France was in possession of the world’s most powerful radio station. That wasn’t exactly true then, as the war had taken its toll on the site. In 1942, the French Resistance damaged the longwave transmitter, and in summer 1944, the Germans blew the complete long wave transmission site up, and destroyed all shortwave installations.

It took Allouis nearly eight years to get back on air, or, more precisely, 164 kHz longwave, a frequency nearly unchanged to this day, broadcasting France Inter programs.2)

In 1950, a shortwave-dedicated transmitter site was built near Issoudun, some 40 km west of Allouis. What had previously been Poste Colonial, Paris Mondial and ORTF Paris became Radio France Internationale (RFI) in 1975. And French radio remained innovative – the ALLISS antenna system’s name is a concatenation of Allouis and Issoudun. ALLISS modules can be found in Issoudun/France (1995), Montsinery/French Guyana (1996), Nauen/Germany (1997), in Oman (2002), China (2003), Kuwait (2009), and possibly Cuba (still speculation).

RFI Montsinery QSL

Radio France Internationale (RFI) QSL, 1988/89, confirming reception of a Montsinery relay broadcast on 9,800 kHz.

An overseas transmitter site was Montsinery, in French Guyana, inaugurated in 1984. France closed the South American facilities in 2013. Issoudun’s shortwave transmitters stay on air.

-

2. Recent Logs, May 2014

International Telecommunication Union letter codes used in the table underneath:
AFS – South Africa; ALB – Albania; ARG – Argentina; BIH – Bosnia and Herzegovina; CUB – Cuba; D – Germany; EGY – Egypt; F – France; G – Great Britain; IND – India; IRN – Iran; J – Japan; KRE – North Korea; OMA – Oman; PLW – Palau; ROU – Romania; SVN – Slovenia; THA – Thailand; TIB – Tibet; UKR – Ukraine.

Languages (“L.”):
C – Chinese; E – English; G – German.

kHz

Station

Ctry

L.

Day

GMT

S I O
15140 Radio
Oman
OMA E May
2
14:30 4 5 4
  6130 PBS
Tibet
TIB E May
2
16:00 4 3 3
  5040 RHC
Cuba
CUB E May
3
05:00 4 5 4
    918 Radio
Slovenia
SVN E May
5
20:30 5 5 5
    918 Radio
Slovenia
SVN G May
5
20:33 5 4 4
 9540 Radio
Japan
J C May
7
15:30 5 3 4
11710 RAE
Buenos
Aires
ARG E May
8
02:00 5 4 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
D G May
10
21:00 5 4 4
13695 AIR
Delhi
IND E  May
11
10:00 2 3 2
 7410 IRIB
Tehran
IRN G  May
11
17:23 5 5 4
12015 Voice of
Korea *)
KRE G May
11
19:00 5 4 4
 9540 Radio
Japan
J C May
12
15:30 4 5 4
15345 RAE
Buenos
Aires
ARG G May
13
21:00 3 4 3
15140 Radio
Oman
OMA E May
19
14:27 5 5 4
 9540 Radio
Japan
J C May
19
15:30 5 3 3
15235 Channel
Africa
AFS E May
19
16:00 5 5 5
 6130 PBS
Tibet
TIB E May
19
16:38 4 3 3
 7550 AIR
Delhi
IND E May
19
17:45 5 5 4
15344.3 RAE
Buenos
Aires
ARG E May
23
18:00 3 4 3
 9410 Radio
Cairo**)
EGY G May
23
19:00 4 3 2
 6100 Radio
Serbia
International
BIH G May
23
20:00 4 2 3
 9510 IRRS
Milano
ROU E May
24
08:00 5 5 5
11970 Radio
Japan
F E May
25
07:00 4 5 4
 5975 Radio
Japan
G E May
25
07:15 5 5 5
11980.2
(USB)
Radio
Dniprovska
Hvyla ***)
UKR  ? May
25
08:04 3 4 3
 9540 Radio
Japan
J C May
25
15:30 4 4 4
12015 Voice of
Korea
KRE G May
25
18:00 5 5 5
 6100 Radio
Serbia
International
BIH G May
25
20:00 5 3 3
   918 Radio
Slovenia
SVN E May
25
22:35 5 4 4
   918 Radio
Slovenia
SVN May
25
22:39 5 4 4
 3995 HCJB
Weener-
moor
D G May
31
04:30 5 5 4
 9965 Radio
Australia
PLW E May
31
13:20 4 3 3
 9390 Radio
Thailand
THA E May
31
19:00 5 5 4
 7465 Radio
Tirana
ALB May
31
19:30 4 5 4

 

*) Some Radio Nacional de Espana interference, at times I=3
**) Modulation horrible
***) The language sounded like Russian to me. If one of you understands Russian, please let me know, and I’ll upload my recording of the transmission and publish the link. Would like to know if this was Ukranian or indeed Russian.

____________

Footnotes

1) Towards the end of World War 2, after the liberation of France, all private radio stations were nationalized by decree. It took more than 36 years before the state monopoly on radio broadcasting was terminated – oddly by a socialist president, Francois Mitterand.
2) International frequency planning arranged for a lowering of longwave frequencies by two kHz – Allouis adapted France Inter long wave to 162 kHz in 1986. This applied to all European long wave frequencies. Also in accordance with the wavelength plan, the Droitwich longwave transmitter broadcasting BBC Radio 4 went from 200 kHz to 198 kHz.

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Related

» Journal en francais facile, RFI, cont. updated
» Comparing China and Europe, Jan 1, 2012
» No radio jamming kit, Reuters, Mar 31, 2008

» Previous shortwave logs
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Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Obituary: Chris Gelken, 1955 – 2014

Chris Gelken, a former anchor and editor at China Radio International, Press TV (Iran), and media in Hong Kong and South Korea, died in the French city of Limoges on April 4, aged 58, according to the Korea Herald online.

____________

Related

» BC and AD, Ridealist, October 14, 2013
» Have we met, Dec 6, 2011
» Publish & be damned, Korea Herald, April 5, 2010

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